If the power elites didn’t need the consent of the public to rule, they wouldn’t have to lie constantly about their reasons for war. What if its 1984 and you don't know it because you haven't recognized who big brother is yet.

Friday, July 27, 2018

of course 'our' government never lies to us and if we say iran attacks us, of course that would be the case, and the gulf of tonkin was really what the 'news' said it was because we have a free press and all of those who say it was a hoax are doing drugs, and we bring democracy everywhere we go, ...........

Often, the American mainstream media becomes a de facto government employee, taking the claims of U.S. officials and reporting them as proven fact — and nothing exemplifies this penchant better than reporting on the Gulf of Tonkin incident — perhaps one of most flagrant lies ever dreamed up as a justification for war.
On August 5, 1964, the New York Times reported “President Johnson has ordered retaliatory action against gunboats and ‘certain supporting facilities in North Vietnam’ after renewed attacks against American destroyers in the Gulf of Tonkin.” Additional outlets, such as the Washington Post, echoed this claim.
But it wasn’t true. At all. In fact, the Gulf of Tonkin incident, as it became known, turned out to be a fictitious creation courtesy of the government to escalate war in Vietnam — leading to the deaths of tens of thousands of U.S. troops and millions of Vietnamese, fomenting the largest anti-war movement in American history, and tarnishing the reputation of a nation once considered at least somewhat noble in the eyes of the world.
In 2010, more than 1,100 transcripts from the Vietnam era were released, proving Congress and officials raised serious doubts about the information fed to them by the Pentagon and White House. But while this internal grumbling took place, mainstream media dutifully reported official statements as if the veracity of the information couldn’t be disputed.

 
http://www.thetruthseeker.co.uk/?p=173756

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